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Shoot with Your Smartphone

Lesson 25 from: Video Production Essentials: Create, Edit and Post Online​

Philip Ebiner, Sam Shimizu-Jones, Will Carnahan

Shoot with Your Smartphone

Lesson 25 from: Video Production Essentials: Create, Edit and Post Online​

Philip Ebiner, Sam Shimizu-Jones, Will Carnahan

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Lesson Info

25. Shoot with Your Smartphone

Lessons

Class Trailer

Chapter 1 Introduction

1

Welcome to the Class

02:12
2

What Makes a Great Video

03:17
3

What Type of Video Should You Make

02:47

Chapter 2: Pre-production

4

Come up with a Great Video Ideas

05:05
5

Plan Your Video

03:30
6

The Pre-production Checklist

04:04

Chapter 3 Equipment - Our Suggestions for Getting Started

7

Does Equipment Matter

01:34
8

Our Recommended Cameras

06:00
9

Our Recommended Audio Equipment

04:37
10

Our Recommended Lighting Equipment

01:47
11

Our Recommended Editing Equipment

02:11
12

Our Recommended Drone Equipment

05:35
13

Quiz: Chapter 3

Chapter 4:Cinematography Basics

14

Exposing Your Shots

05:25
15

Compose Your Shots

04:25
16

Filming Yourself

01:09
17

Getting the Right Shot

03:43
18

Choose a Background

02:32
19

My Office Video Setup

02:54
20

Quiz: Chapter 4

Chapter 5: Tips for Shooting with Different Cameras

21

Exposing with DSLR and Mirrorless Cameras

06:31
22

Focus with DSLR and Mirrorless Cameras

02:35
23

Stabilize Your Shots

02:57
24

Know Your Lenses

03:18
25

Shoot with Your Smartphone

05:10
26

Shoot with Your Webcam

05:49
27

Record Great Screencast Videos

04:20
28

Tips for Better Drone Shots

04:06
29

Types of Drone Shots

01:43
30

Quiz: Chapter 5

Chapter 6: Audio Recording and Microphones

31

Choose the Right Microphone for Your Video

03:14
32

Record Better Audio in Any Environment

01:27
33

How to Use a Lavalier Microphone

02:47
34

How to Use a Shotgun Microphone

00:55
35

How to Record Audio with Your Computer

01:27
36

Quiz: Chapter 6

Chapter 7: Video Lighting

37

Why We Light

01:03
38

Use Natural Light

04:14
39

The 3-point Video Lighting Setup

07:26
40

Quiz: Chapter 7

Chapter 8: Editing Better Videos

41

Intro to Editing

02:15
42

The Post-production Process

07:50
43

Craft a Story with Editing

05:21
44

Improve Your Audio with Editing

06:34
45

Find and Add Music

05:12
46

Design Clean and Professional Titles

03:15
47

Increase Video Engagement with Calls to Action

01:29
48

Quiz: Chapter 8

Chapter 9: Get More Views - Publishing Your Video Online

49

Export the Best Quality Video for Online

02:54
50

Tips for Posting Online

05:28
51

Grow Your Youtube Channel

04:41
52

Quiz: Chapter 9

Chapter 10: Case Studies: Real-world Filmmaking

53

Case Study - Corporate Promo Videos with Ghirardelli Chocolate

08:54
54

Case Study - Event Videography with Major Lazer

08:39
55

Case Study - Documentary Films with Phil

14:24
56

Case Study - Shooting By Yourself

15:32
57

Case Study - Wedding Videography

08:37
58

Case Study - Phil's Livestream Setup

04:23

Chapter 11: Conclusion

59

Thank You

00:59

Final Quiz

60

Final Quiz

Lesson Info

Shoot with Your Smartphone

So in this lesson we're gonna talk about shooting video with your smartphone. Now I have an iphone and some of you may have other phones but I'm just gonna kind of go over the basics so we can get into it. So first let's talk about settings here. I'm gonna go into my settings and we're going to look for the camera part depending on your phone. You have different options for resolution. You can do on this phone 20 at 30 frames per 2nd. 10 80 at 30 10 80 at 30. And you can also do four K. At 30 frames per second. The default best for iphones is usually 10 80 P. H. D. At 30 frames per second. That's going to get your standard best video on this phone. It will do slow motion and we can have 10 80 at 120 frames per second. Or 7 20 at 240 frames per 2nd. 10 80 is the typical resolution for your standard 1920 by 10 80 tv in your living room typically. So we're going to leave it at 230 frames per second for slo mo because I like that slo mo and we're going to leave the 10 80 at 30 frames per ...

second for the normal video shooting. So let's go back to our camera and we got Phil here doing some woodwork for us. We're gonna swipe over to video. So now we're in video mode on our smartphone and we're looking at Phil the main thing with video for me is to make sure that your phone is horizontal because when you end up exporting this or you show it on Youtube, you want to get the full range and the full sensor of your phone if your vertical, which a lot of people tend to do because you hold your phone that way, it's just gonna be a little sliver of video and it's gonna be really hard to show that on full screen. So let's see we have Phil here automatically, the phone is going to try and adjust to his face, you can see that it's trying to look for your face and for this phone, it's very much trying to focus on that. Most smartphones are all going to be auto focus. There are a few where you can adjust it, but generally because of the small lens, it's going to do it itself. So let's go ahead and record video and you can see, I'm really kind of just using my ideas of rule of thirds and composing a nice shot and I'm trying to hold it as steady as possible because it's such a small iphone, you can see there's a little bit of shake and you're just gonna have to kind of get used to that and just like the focus, you're just gonna have to kind of get used to practicing it and making sure that you can kind of hold it steady. Another great thing with the phones is you can see how it's exposing automatically. This phone is doing it pretty subtly when you turn out here, you can see how it just exposed greatly for the for the tons of sun. We're in a garage right now and when I come back into the shade it does it automatically for this phone. Also I can tap on a position and I can move the exposure up and down. You can see the little sun going up and that's making it brighter, blowing Phil out and blowing the sun out and then I was like come down manually. It's getting darker and darker and that may be uh sometimes you need to fight with the smartphone itself because it's trying to expose it automatically. But here I've exposed a little bit lower, it looks a little bit nicer. Um The shadows are a little deeper and the black soil dark, it's a little more dramatic. So here's another thing for smartphones focusing, it likes to do auto focus typically. But here if you tap in a certain area it will focus itself. I mean it really close to this wood block and you can see I'm tapping here and it's focusing directly on the wood block as opposed to Phil's face. If we tap on Phil's face, It should focus slowly on Phil's face again. This depends on the model of phone you have. This is an IPhone seven and it seems to be doing a pretty good job of that. So let's try slow mo. The big thing about slo mo is shifting over to it here. Now we're in slow mo and you can't really tell right now because we have a lot of light coming in but when you shift into slo mo you're gonna lose a lot of light. What it's doing internally is it's shooting more frames per second, which means there's frames that are in front of the camera for less amount of time, which means the light's going to hit those les filles gonna start to sand this little piece of thing really, really fast as soon as we start shooting and we'll see what slo mo ends up looking like. So checking out this clip, it's really cool. This is 240 frames per second and it's actually at 7 it's not at 10 80. Shooting something that has a lot of motion will look a lot better when you're shooting slow motion, it'll actually show the effect more. Keep in mind if you're shooting yourself for a vlog or for instruction you can always do selfies with your video camera on your smartphone. So remember there's a little button in the upper right corner now you see me and I'm looking into the camera, it's nice remember keeping our rules in mind but also paying attention to what's behind you and also making sure that your finger doesn't cover the camera. So right now I have a lot of white light coming in. It's lots of soft light from a garage door. If we spin around we can see our crew back there. There's Phil and sam the same rules apply with the tapping. We can tap to expose over here and we can kind of manually tap as well as focusing. You can focus on me and the exposure or I can focus on these guys back here by tapping. So a couple of pro tips for recording yourself on your own smartphone is one looking into the camera on your phone. It's much better and engages the audience as opposed to looking at yourself. Another one is keeping the camera eye level, keeping yourself centered. And finally if you want to show some stuff framing up to see your friends and chat, there's also lots of different things that you can get for your smartphone. You can get tripods, you can get stabilizers, you really can set it down anywhere. It really is a camera that you're carrying with you in your pocket all the time.

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