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Exposing Your Shots

Lesson 14 from: Video Production Essentials: Create, Edit and Post Online​

Philip Ebiner, Sam Shimizu-Jones, Will Carnahan

Exposing Your Shots

Lesson 14 from: Video Production Essentials: Create, Edit and Post Online​

Philip Ebiner, Sam Shimizu-Jones, Will Carnahan

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Lesson Info

14. Exposing Your Shots

Next Lesson: Compose Your Shots

Lessons

Class Trailer

Chapter 1 Introduction

1

Welcome to the Class

02:12
2

What Makes a Great Video

03:17
3

What Type of Video Should You Make

02:47

Chapter 2: Pre-production

4

Come up with a Great Video Ideas

05:05
5

Plan Your Video

03:30
6

The Pre-production Checklist

04:04

Chapter 3 Equipment - Our Suggestions for Getting Started

7

Does Equipment Matter

01:34
8

Our Recommended Cameras

06:00
9

Our Recommended Audio Equipment

04:37
10

Our Recommended Lighting Equipment

01:47
11

Our Recommended Editing Equipment

02:11
12

Our Recommended Drone Equipment

05:35
13

Quiz: Chapter 3

Chapter 4:Cinematography Basics

14

Exposing Your Shots

05:25
15

Compose Your Shots

04:25
16

Filming Yourself

01:09
17

Getting the Right Shot

03:43
18

Choose a Background

02:32
19

My Office Video Setup

02:54
20

Quiz: Chapter 4

Chapter 5: Tips for Shooting with Different Cameras

21

Exposing with DSLR and Mirrorless Cameras

06:31
22

Focus with DSLR and Mirrorless Cameras

02:35
23

Stabilize Your Shots

02:57
24

Know Your Lenses

03:18
25

Shoot with Your Smartphone

05:10
26

Shoot with Your Webcam

05:49
27

Record Great Screencast Videos

04:20
28

Tips for Better Drone Shots

04:06
29

Types of Drone Shots

01:43
30

Quiz: Chapter 5

Chapter 6: Audio Recording and Microphones

31

Choose the Right Microphone for Your Video

03:14
32

Record Better Audio in Any Environment

01:27
33

How to Use a Lavalier Microphone

02:47
34

How to Use a Shotgun Microphone

00:55
35

How to Record Audio with Your Computer

01:27
36

Quiz: Chapter 6

Chapter 7: Video Lighting

37

Why We Light

01:03
38

Use Natural Light

04:14
39

The 3-point Video Lighting Setup

07:26
40

Quiz: Chapter 7

Chapter 8: Editing Better Videos

41

Intro to Editing

02:15
42

The Post-production Process

07:50
43

Craft a Story with Editing

05:21
44

Improve Your Audio with Editing

06:34
45

Find and Add Music

05:12
46

Design Clean and Professional Titles

03:15
47

Increase Video Engagement with Calls to Action

01:29
48

Quiz: Chapter 8

Chapter 9: Get More Views - Publishing Your Video Online

49

Export the Best Quality Video for Online

02:54
50

Tips for Posting Online

05:28
51

Grow Your Youtube Channel

04:41
52

Quiz: Chapter 9

Chapter 10: Case Studies: Real-world Filmmaking

53

Case Study - Corporate Promo Videos with Ghirardelli Chocolate

08:54
54

Case Study - Event Videography with Major Lazer

08:39
55

Case Study - Documentary Films with Phil

14:24
56

Case Study - Shooting By Yourself

15:32
57

Case Study - Wedding Videography

08:37
58

Case Study - Phil's Livestream Setup

04:23

Chapter 11: Conclusion

59

Thank You

00:59

Final Quiz

60

Final Quiz

Lesson Info

Exposing Your Shots

Hey, welcome to a new section in the course this section is all about actually how to shoot video with your camera in this lesson. We're talking about exposure basically how to make sure your video is bright enough, not too bright or not too dark with whatever camera you're using. So we're actually going to head out to a real world location where SaM is going to explain how to properly expose your video. So now we're going to talk about exposure and really what this comes down to is how much light is in your frame and we decided to do this in Phil's kitchen just because a lot of times in documentaries are you know even shooting something for yourself, you want to be in a natural environment. So when it comes to exposure light is really what we're talking about. It's how much light is on your subject, how much light is in your frame. And there's three ways that you control this with a smartphone, you won't necessarily set these but they will be affecting your image. And for DSLR Zormier...

Ellis cameras it's really essential. And that's your shutter speed, your f stop or iris or aperture and your I. S. O. So the first is shutter speed back in the day. You know for an old film camera this would be you take a photo and how quickly did that shutter expose your piece of film. Now when it comes to film or video? Think of every second this shutter is moving up and down allowing light in A slower shutter speed allows more light a faster shutter speed allows less light. So currently I'm at 1/ shutter speed. Uh so let's go a little bit slower. Oh man, we're getting way overexposed here, like get the exposure. All right, so I'm at a one, let's go 1/10 shutter speed. I'm now at F 6.3 I. S. 0. 200. And you know when the image is still, you can't really tell the difference. But Phil if you could. There we go, see the hand is all blurry, you can't really see if you're moving the camera, it has this weird sort of jittery effect. It can be really cool. And this is actually a lot of people do this at night time to get a cool ghostly effect. Now let's bring the shutter back And I just want to show that movement again at 1/50 shutter. And this is really what I consider to be the standard. So you can see there's still a little bit of that blur, but it's manageable, it looks more natural. Now let's go up to let's go crazy, let's go to 1 400 shutter and I think this is where a lot of people go out into the day and they need to expose properly so they bring their shutter way up. So I'm at 1 400 shutter iso 200 F 2.8 and you can see there's a lot less blur on his hand now it's a much sharper crisper image. Some people like this effect, you know, saving private Ryan is a great example of higher shutter stuff. Uh But it can look a little too sterile, a little too digital for me. So personally I like to issue 1/50 next is F stop. It's how much light your lenses allowing in. So on the inside there's an aperture, it's very similar to your eyes. You know when there's a lot of light you'll have to close down the aperture, making a much smaller hole If you want to allow more light in. You open it up so we're at 2.8 here, you can see that the backgrounds slightly out of focus, feels nicely in focus and there's depth there. So let's close it down now to let's see let's go let's go crazy. We at 11 now which for indoors is kind of crazy. So we'll bring the esso up and now you can see that a lot more is in focus, you can see the background image, you can see feel and focus. Everything's kind of in focus. So this can be great if you're running and gunning or maybe you're trying to have everything just look nice and firm and everything in focus. For me personally I love being as open as possible. I think having that shallow depth of field is really the look I prefer but it's different for everyone. The final thing. And really as I've been adjusting all these things, The shutters remain the same. It's about 1/50 where F 2.8 but the I. S. O. Served the last last piece to this puzzle really what I was so used to be is it was the sensitivity of your film. It was how how well did it perform in low light versus how Un sensitive was it? You know if you went out into the sunlight and needed something that took more light to expose. So currently in my eyes. So to which is pretty good. And you can see now let's Go up to 1600. This is also 1600. It's so much more sensitive to light its way overexposed. I have to bring my f. Stop all the way to F 8 to look well exposed. All these numbers do coincide with one another. To keep it simple. It's how sensitive is your camera. And at that certain cameras perform better with higher I. S. O. S. The reason that the A. Seven S. Two is so popular is that you can shoot at these crazy high I. S. O. S. Other cameras are not so much for a smartphone. The ISo sensitivity really only takes you so far because it's just a smaller camera, smaller sensor. All these other things. So those are really the essentials for exposure. And as we go into uh D. SLRs and other cameras we'll get more in depth about how you actually expose your image and how you use these tools. Because if you're trying to really get serious about filmmaking while this can seem daunting and like a lot of information, it's something important to learn. And really it's it comes second nature after so long, so we'll get to that later, and now we're going to be talking about composition.

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i love the way they teach the course. its very understandable

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