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Andrew Shoots Door and Interior Details

Lesson 15 from: Mastering Lightroom Classic & Photoshop Fundamentals

Andrew Kearns

Andrew Shoots Door and Interior Details

Lesson 15 from: Mastering Lightroom Classic & Photoshop Fundamentals

Andrew Kearns

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Lesson Info

15. Andrew Shoots Door and Interior Details

Moving from the exterior to the interior of the truck, Andrew works through several compositions and angles with Eli, vocalizing the process so you can easily follow along. Andrew also works through a wide landscape scene and discusses a panoramic stitch technique to achieve it.

Lesson Info

Andrew Shoots Door and Interior Details

(uplifting music) (truck starting) (camera sounds) We're gonna get the next shot too here with the door hinge shot I drew out of him with the stick figure and the, yeah. You saw the drawing, you know what we're trying to do, hop in the center, just right there. On the seat or just kind of? Standing and then face me. Leg up? Nah, let's do-- maybe leg up and then I want you like centered in that gap right there with the door hinge in the frame. Okay. Yeah. So if you can, it might feel unnatural, but just back up, wedge yourself in there. Uh-huh. And then I'll just shoot like, waist up. Oh yeah, that's sick. (camera clicking) Go profile, looking that way. with your left hand just on the bill of the hat. Oh! Gotcha. Left hand, yeah. Chin up just a bit. Look beyond me over this way, and look just above me here and like right here more so. (camera clicking) Nice, and then can you crank down the window? Yep. What's up? There's our detail shot. What's up, pup? Hop up ...

on the seat actually. And then I'm gonna try this angle real quick but I want to go back to that one in a second. I'm gonna lower my aperture back down to, we'll stick between 2.8 and 3.5-ish. So a lower aperture to get a greater depth of field, to bring out our subject with a blurry background and foreground. I'm definitely shooting more into the bright clouds now. Not a ton, but I'll definitely wanna stop it down. I'm looking at my histogram here and it's honestly a pretty fine balance of losing data in the highlights and the shadows 'cause in the truck it's a lot more shadowed than when we were out here. I'm probably gonna just lose some of the highlights and that's fine, but not a big deal. With the Sony camera, you're able to recover a lot of the shadows. So yeah, I'm not too worried about it, to be honest. Look straight at me here. Chin up just a bit. Act like you're just getting something to the right of you there. (camera clicking) Nice. Great acting. You're a natural. (laughing) I'm gonna shoot through the window here. Same thing, just ham it up, keep acting. (camera clicking) That's a little tricky, it's trying to focus on the window. Nice, I don't know how those will turn out. You might just see my reflection straight up. I'll shoot it from this angle real quick. Not through the window. Shoot it wide-angle 28. Adjust my settings here. I'm gonna change my aperture too to like 6. to get a bit more in focus as we're peering into the car. Maybe go vertical on this. Go back to your hand on that thing, on the box there. (camera clicking) (upbeat music) Nice, it's looking good. There's a bunch of shit in there. Sick, no, looks good. I'm gonna come back to this angle and then shoot him sitting there. Changing the settings and as I'm shooting too, you'll see kind of these pauses in between what I'm doing is I'm just adjusting my focus point. I have it set very small so I can get the specific places. Like when we were just there. His hand was on the steering wheel close to me and was also on, what is that, the control for the plow? Yeah. The plow control with his right hand. So I was kind of switching between both and you literally have to drag this really minute target across the screen. So that's what you are experiencing when there's those lulls in between the shutters. (camera clicking) Look out here toward us. (camera clicking) Nice. Look beyond, towards your house there. (camera clicking) And hold that pose and look straight at me. And then just back up a bit, yeah. And look like right here. (camera clicking) And chin up just a tad. Nice, and look straight out the window. Out the front window. Ah, okay. Yeah. (laughing) Hi Graham. (laughing) (camera clicking) Nice, and sit in the cab as if you're about to start up the car. Yeah. Yeah. I'll probably shoot a few details here, so you can just kind of move your feet around a little bit different poses in there. But yeah. (camera clicking) So what I'm using here is this door frame as a nice leading line into that. So I'm shooting pretty wide, still like 28 to 35 ish right into the scene. But I'm gonna get a few more details here closer in with his hand on the keys, feet on the pedal, stuff like that. Have to change my settings quite a bit. I shot those last photos at 6.3. I probably should have lowered my aperture a bit but it's okay. I'm gonna go f/4 in here and just adjust my settings to that. Also my white balance. I'll just kind of go through the whole motions here, sound good? Yeah, sounds good. Let me know what you're doing next. Yeah, So I'm gonna just, I'll start the truck. (truck starting) Nice. (truck engine) (indistinct chatter) So that leads us perfectly into the next shot. Eli's already in the cab and I drew out that other photo of me sitting on the opposite side of the cab and shooting details, portraits, all that stuff inside the cab. So let's go inside the cab. Come on in. Thanks. This is sick. It looks like my drawing. So as I'm looking at this angle, I love the shot, but just with it being shadowed in here, you have darker interior. Eli's in black as well, darker green as well. The outside is just so much brighter. I personally don't know what will work in this situation. So I'm gonna shoot some brighter images that I'm losing the highlights and things are exposed in here well, but I'm also gonna shoot some darker images where I might bring up the shadows later. To be honest, I don't know what will work but that's the beauty of just taking your time and thinking ahead and shooting both kinds of exposures. So we'll start off with the brighter ones first. I'm gonna shoot probably just f/4 for this and then adjust my settings for that. As you'll see, I'll just take a quick photo and we can put up the raw. (camera clicking) Yeah, so that's the raw image of it being bright. As you can see the background is just pure white, completely lost. If I'm thinking about my post process, the background right now isn't entirely the most important part of this image. So what I can do is just crush my curves and have Eli and the inside evenly the exposed. That's kind of where my mind's at with this. Like I said, I'll get both types of shots but the highlights are just not that important to me. And you can make it seem, feel a little more natural with just crushing the highlights and the curves as well as some split toning in the highlights. But like I said, we'll try both, see what ends up being better. Maybe I shoot dark and I can bring all that data back and not lose any highlights. Time will tell. But the most important part of this image is Eli, so. (camera clicking) Go low here. (upbeat music) Nice. Go back down on the key. (truck starting) It might be unnatural, but will you go left hand on the key? (laughing) The one-armed man. For the photo. Works out. (camera clicking) So right now I'm actually losing the background in the image, so the exposure's very nice for this. I'm gonna get a little closer. (camera clicking) This is a perfect example of why I use that small little targeting point for focusing, 'cause there is a gear shaft, a box to control the plow. There's just so many things and little details going on that could totally mess up if you're using a bigger zone focus and it would not focus on the right thing. Even if it takes a little more time at the moment I think it saves time in the long run and it makes sure you're not wasting images away of it being focused on the wrong thing, being focused on the shaft handle or the plow box. Like I said, I'm gonna shoot a few images of the same scene underexposed and in post we'll see which ones we prefer, the brighter ones or the darker ones. I wanna shoot a little bit different angle too with getting some of the mountains in the background. Keeping it at a f/4, five-ish to 5.6, kind of in that range. Lower my ISO. And so as I'm planning these shots too, and thinking about like what my settings are, I'm really not thinking about all my settings. I'm really specifically thinking about my aperture. If I want it to be 2.8 with a blurry background, I'm gonna change my settings to that. If I want it to be 4.5, 5.6, f/8, f/ if I'm feeling buck wild, I'll do that. But all my settings will just change around what the aperture is. With Sony, you can crank your ISO to stupid amounts and be fine. But even then, I don't think it's gone over 400 or 600 today so far. So currently the aperture is 4.5. I'll probably put it at we'll do f/5.6 for this one and change my settings accordingly. Again, this is more of an underexposed shot. I'm gonna change my composition a bit to get some of these mountains through the window. Let's do it. (upbeat music) (truck starting) I think I like the look, I'd like to get those mountains in the frame. (camera clicking) Cool, and then I'm gonna do something real quick. So I'll have you hold that position and stay really still. Uh-huh. I'm gonna take a few images like a panorama and stitch it together in post. Nice, okay. Just stay really still here. Let me get a focus on... (camera clicking) And one more, I'm gonna change my angle slightly. Make sure his whole body's in the shot. I'm actually gonna start in the middle. Zoom out just a tad. (camera clicking) Cool. Oh wow. We have some lighting starting to come in on the mountains. Yeah. That's nice. So at the tail end of that there, I started shooting a few panoramas and the reason why is because (cat meowing) (laughing) Dude, this is great. This is all I wanted in a workshop, honestly. So at the end there I opted to do a panorama shot of the whole thing, and the reason why is 'cause if you zoom in a little bit you get that compression with the layer. So you have the truck and you have the mountains and the mountains like a lot bigger in frame. So you can stay wide-angle and get a landscape orientation shot of it. But, if you zoom in a little bit, you turn it vertical. You go like that, take a few images like that. Stitch 'em together. You're gonna get more compression in your images. I probably shot that around 35 or 50 millimeters. So the mountains looked a lot bigger in frame and it's still the same composition. As you're stitching those together, you're gonna have a lot more compression in your shot but it's pretty much the same composition as I was shooting before. And to be honest, I won't really know if it works out until I see it in post, but it's just another idea to try. And you know, I think it'll work out, though. I think it'll be really cool to have that same composition but a lot more compressed so you get Eli with the mountains in the background, and it's just a really good lay of the land and a good variety to add to the entire story we're telling here. (upbeat music) (camera clicking) So I don't actually have a zoom lens for the Sony. So I brought out the trusty rusty, the old 5D Mark II. Hyped on this thing, I will never sell it. And I actually have, I'll show it to you here. This lens, it's an old 80 to 200 for like a, I think it's for some SLR camera in like the seventies or nineties or eighties or something. This thing is amazing. I got on eBay for like 40 bucks. Honestly, this camera combination with this lens is probably cheaper by a long shot than any other Sony zoom lens. And I love the colors of the 5D Mark II. It looks like film right out of the camera. Right now we have some warm colors forming on the mountains up there. Very subtle, but I mean we can ramp it up in editing if we want. And it's just nice. It's nice to get a little variety like that. And if we're thinking about a shoot like in it's entirety where you have a bunch of images that work together to tell a story, getting this variety of landscape as well as portraits, details, lifestyle shots is great. So I'll probably shoot a few landscapes, maybe frame a couple with Eli in there as well. And then we'll probably wait it out till blue hour then to get some blue hour shots. So let's get a few landscapes. (upbeat music) The sensor needs to be cleaned. It probably hasn't been cleaned in a decade, honestly. Look more just behind you at the mountains. Yeah, yeah. Hold that, sick. So I have to be a little more aware of my exposure here 'cause this camera's probably over a decade old at this point, whereas the Sony's came out not too long ago. So just have to be more aware of how I'm exposing the image. And with this, I just wanna make sure Eli and the truck are exposed. He's wearing a darker shirt. The background's also dark with the mountains. The tires are also dark and it's shadowed underneath. I wanna expose it up a little bit. I don't think I'll lose any highlight data but just something to be aware of depending on what camera you're shooting on. And we are currently, I wanna like bump it up to f/6.3. Yeah, he looks pretty exposed there. I'm gonna do another panorama, just going up. I just really love that compression with him, with the mountains, all that, that looks really good. I think it will, I think that will come out in post pretty nice. (upbeat music) (camera clicking) I can always just stamp out the cat. Cool, so what I did there is I just took a ton of images, same thing, panorama stitch. And I don't know if I'll use that full image but in my mind, what I'm thinking right now, is that I will have a lot to choose and I can crop it however I want. So really just thinking about post processing here. (cat meowing) Yeah, this cat knows what's up, right? Stitch those photos. What's the cat's name? Maui. Maui. You're a little far from home. She's a mauer. Mauer. She does a lot of talking. I'll probably get a few more images with the 80 to 200. I wanna try to run into some grass around here and get some detail shots of just Eli in the frame. And then yeah, we'll shoot blue hour. We're gonna run the aperture at 7.1 right now. The ISO again is pushing pretty high for the Mark II at 1250. But again, not really concerned about that. I wanna get a shot of Eli getting into the truck again with the 80 to 200 pretty compressed with the layers of the mountain in the background, him getting in the truck. With such a zoomed focal length it will create a little bit of blur, but I really don't wanna raise the aperture any higher 'cause I'll have to push the ISO even higher. So, yeah. I'm usually not a cat person but when they're like really friendly, I love them. Yeah, she's like the shop cat but she wants as much to love as she can possibly get. Oh, she found the right person. Gonna have to cut here. (beep) All right, cool. I'll have you approach from this side, just straight in. All right, go ahead. (upbeat music) (camera clicking) Nice, and go ahead and hop out. Nice, and then I'm gonna take a little panorama. I just had Eli walk up to the truck and get in, just do that full motion. And then after that I shot a big photo stitch of the surrounding thing. My plan for that is I'll probably have him hop in and out of the truck a few more times. And once again, I have this huge, even though I'm shooting with an and it's only getting a very small part of the frame, which is just the ground, the door area, and the mountains in the background, now that I've shot all of this, the exposure's changing a little bit. So I might have to re-shoot it. But for the most part, I could do a few takes of this and then stitch in what I already shot prior. And that's just gonna, again thinking about post processing. I will have a variety of crops to choose from if that makes sense. And as I'm shooting too, you're gonna see me stay lower to the ground for this shot because I wanna shoot straight up to the mountains and any of the grass or some of the trees and distractions there that just kind of make the photo too busy, I wanna just cut out of the frame. (cat meowing) (laughing) Oh man. Yeah, that's, that's where I'm thinking there as I'm going lower for the frame. So, let's run that again. All right, go ahead. (camera clicking) And same thing, when you come out... Wait, hop back in real quick. Hop back in real quick. (camera clicking) Like it's gonna feel weird getting out but for the photo, it should work. Come out with your right foot first and then walk more toward me. Okay. One second. My card in this is really slow so I have to make sure it writes all the images before shooting the next one. (camera clicking) Nice. That's sick, I like this. It's getting dark a little bit. It is. Let's grab the Sony, switch to that. 'Cause this thing is pumping like ISO 1600, which is not good for the 10 year old camera. That's not the correct lens cap.

Class Materials

Bonus Materials with Purchase

Workshop PDF
View Andrew's Selects
Sonora Edit - Before and After
Mountains Edit - Before and After
Edit 01 - Before and After
Edit 02 - Before and After
Edit 03 - Before and After
Wildist-Kearns-Edit_File-01.ARW
Wildist-Kearns-Edit_File-02.ARW
Wildist-Kearns-Edit_File-03.ARW

Ratings and Reviews

Ratul Dutta
 

This class is really like a good investment. It's gonna help you step by step and you can come back to it multiple times when you need to. Been watching Andrew Kearns on YouTube since 2018. Massive fan of his editing style. I wanted this class as soon as I saw the discount rate. Being a student from a different country, I probably wouldn't have been able to afford it at it's original price. This workshop goes in real depth towards the "approach" of editing a photo. I learnt a tonne of cool stuff. So many new things. Subtle yet so powerful.

Mack Woodruff
 

Incredibly Eye Opening This workshop truly opened up a whole new world of editing techniques that I didn't fully realize existed. I'd recommend this workshop for anyone who has a basic understanding of LR and PS already and are hoping to take it to new levels. I will keep coming back to it for a long time!

Veronica Ettedgui
 

Very very nice!!

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