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Varied Baseline or Cap Height

Lesson 15 from: Hand Lettering 101

Annica Lydenberg

Varied Baseline or Cap Height

Lesson 15 from: Hand Lettering 101

Annica Lydenberg

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Lesson Info

15. Varied Baseline or Cap Height

Lesson Info

Varied Baseline or Cap Height

For our next problems, we're going to do something that I've actually done a couple of times already throughout this peace, but now whether or not you've been doing it, tio, we're gonna make sure we do it with this one, so we're going to pick something and we're gonna have a varied either cap height or baseline or maybe both. Um, this is a really nice way to add in some war movement and just makes your type feel a lot more dynamic so as to do this, you can also tilt and skew your letters like you see I did with the word a racer here, um, or I also varied the the bass line for for these as well, so this is also super fantastic as we get down to only three spots left on our map. If you're having trouble filling an awkward space varied cap line and base height can be the perfect way to do that. Um, your letter forms can also be changing and height as you go that's up to you, but the idea is just to get something a little bit more friendly and bouncy and nick so I'm gonna go ahead and I'm ...

going to dio oh, hi guys, which little light in the day to be saying hello, but nonetheless I'm going to dio hi guys next so hopefully, this prompt will be a really fun and easy one for you guys to dio the buried baseline and cap. It can be a really fantastic way to fill in. Some say super complicated, tight spaces. As we get down to the very end of this project. Esso. I hope you have fun with that one, and I will see you when you're ready for your next propped.

Class Materials

Bonus Materials with Purchase

Hand Lettering Tips
Reference Alphabets

Ratings and Reviews

DOlores RUsso
 

I like the way Annica tells you what you are going to do, then she demonstrates it and then you do it yourself. She knows her subject well and her lesson objectives are clear and to the point. How do I know.?..I'm a teaching mentor also an art teacher and sign painting/lettering artist. I watched this hand lettering class in order to review and to learn how someone else approaches this "not very interesting subject" as some previous reviewers have suggested . I happen to find it most interesting. I love being able to write and communicate using my art and teaching skills. One reviewer criticized the way Annica instructed with "um" and a clicking noise. But the one criticism that really stood out was the F-word which unfortunately seemed to take precedence over all else for some. Granted you wouldn't want to illustrate a word that children or parents might interpret as being acceptable. A good teacher would not demonstrate that but observing Annica I can see she is a beginning teacher who might need a little guidance. So consider this "guidance" Annica - you are a teacher and you represent all of us teachers. We aren't in our 20's or even 40's - we've been in the trenches and we know that beginning teaching is very challenging. But you must remember that you are a model for children that we hope you expect to grow up to be good decent human beings. Some adults need that guidance as well. And yes, children will already know these words (pay attention parents) but it is not up to you to teach it to them. You, the teacher, are to teach to the highest professional level. As for the "um" and the clicking noise at the end of a sentence - that is something you can correct easily - try to record your lessons and listen. Remember - you represent the most respected of professions, your language must be accurate, acceptable and reflect the knowledge of your subject area, You did a good lesson in hand lettering and covered the most important concepts for a beginner to know. It's a shame that some of the reviewers refused to watch the rest of your lessons and some of them even complained about your silence as you did the letters. Perhaps a little more understanding on their part could have been more beneficial, particularly since one of them was a gifted educator (my Masters also), and did not recognize the cognitive mind working and literally submerged in your lettering skills. This is a fine class and I hope you continue to do more. You are organized, give a lot of information and demonstrate impeccably. Good luck...from your Mentor Teacher.

a Creativelive Student
 

Rating this is difficult because there are positives and negatives. I watched the course and enjoyed it, but there isn't enough information and education to validate purchasing it. For a graphic designer or someone who knows typography and wants to have a fun challenge around hand drawn lettering, it's fine. However, it's not a course for absolute beginners because the presenter speaks about typographic principles and assumes the audience knows the names of the parts of type when giving directions and doesn't provide enough explanations. There is no history given as to why letterforms are drawn the way they are, whether as traditional hand lettering, calligraphy or even in sign painting, other than the passing recommendation for viewers to research this. All of the comments here are correct. I too was surprised to see the F-word in a featured piece and the lack of contrast when watching her draw was a problem. CreativeLive needs to vet new presenters and perhaps have them do a dry-run of the lessons to critique them. Additionally, her"umms", "super" and "super fun" fillers are tiresome. I think the presenter is talented and has a lot to offer but this felt more like a design challenge rather than an educational course. It would have been useful to primarily show professional applications rather than so many self-directed projects. There is another hand lettering /calligraphy course I watched part of previously that was a better "101" course, to which this course would be an appropriate follow-up.

Heidi
 

This class was exactly what I needed to re-gain confidence in hand lettering. I majored in illustration 10+ years ago and while I did take a typography class in school, it's been many years and I was feeling rusty and nervous about hand lettering. This class refreshed my memory on various typography principles and gave me ideas on various styles I can reference to create my own lettering. I love the format where I can watch her example and then try it for myself - it's like training wheels and works perfectly for me as a visual learner. Annica is obviously a pro at what she does and she's also really good at explaining what she's doing and why. I am really happy with this class and thankful to Annica for sharing her knowledge and experience.

Student Work

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