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UX Facilitation Overview

Lesson 1 from: FAST CLASS: Fast and Effective UX Design: Learn the Process

Jose Caballer

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Lesson Info

1. UX Facilitation Overview

Lesson Info

UX Facilitation Overview

Let's start with UX and live facilitation. You wanted to learn, Mary, some terms and some of this stuff in jargon and like concrete terms. There's a lot of 'em. So, you know, we have IA, UX, UI, user experience, UXD, customer experience, CX, CXD, design thinking, lean UX, agile UX. You're like, Ahhh, what does that mean, who cares? None of this all matters. They're all mean something. Read the definitions. I don't worry about all these things because they're all the same thing. They all talk about how do you get, you know, from knowing what you need to delivering it at the end of the day, whether it's a customer experience or the user experience, they're just words. But for the sake of today, let's just talk about user experience design and the definition of it by the dictionary. The process of enhancing user satisfaction by improving the usability, accessibility and pleasure provided in the interaction between the user and a product. So that's kinda like a really broad definition. So ...

accessibility, usability, pleasure. Those are all fairly simple. Now, the challenge is, who's a filmmaker here? I'm not a genius. I'm guessing. I mean, I'm talking, I talked to you, but, in film, filmmaking, the word filmmaking, you think of the film when it's in the cannon and you're watching it in the theater, this is a film. It was made by filmmaking, but it had a cinematographer. It had a director. It had, you know, craft services. It had art director, it had costumes, it had an editor, it had color correction. It had a financier. It had all these different roles. Collectively, it's all filmmaking, right? The same is the case with user experience. All of these are aspects of user experience, the actual design, the visual design, the functionality, the information architecture. They're all are part of creating a good, a user experience. You can make a bad one. So, a user experience. Today, and what we're going to talk about and cover is really talking about things that inform the information architect, the architecture, the functionality, the usability of the product, content strategy, potentially. A good way to illustrate this is also from the book, "The Elements of User Experience" by Jesse James Garrett whose one of the Seminole books written about user experience. So Eric, you're transitioning from print to web. This is a great book to have in your library. Everybody should have this in their library. And it really looks at the different elements of user experience in terms of layers from abstract to concrete. So the surface is what we see, you know, the interface, the two buttons on this, you know, the interface on my iPhone. The next thing is to skeleton, which is what we call wire frames, what it is structured as. Below that it's overall taxonomy or the structure of the site. You know what this, what sections it have, et cetera. This is an important one, especially if you're working in a startup and we talked about this, what's the scope? Like, what are you actually building and why? And the third, the, well, not the third to fifth, I know how to count fairly well. The fifth or the base layer is the strategy, which is the question of why. Why do we do this? And when you're a strategist. And this is where you come in with a client, figuring out why do you do this? We all know this aspect, you know, of user experience, the deliverables. Wire frames, site maps, there's a bunch of other ones, user personas. If you've gone to any course in user experience, you've been trained or you've been shown what these are. The question is, how do you use these? And in what context. So today, and then what we're going to cover. We're really going to shift our mindset. And a lot of people call what we're talking about design thinking, and IBM recently released a really great study about how IBM is using design. Keep in mind, the definition of design is not graphics because there's product design. There's all types of design, architecture. There's design is to organize. That's what, if you look in the dictionary, it says, I have designs on, I have plans on. So planning and organizing is what really design is. The visualization aspect of it, or pre-visualization is required for you to be able to envision what it is that you're gonna make. If it's something that's manifested in the real world, it has to, you have to see it. That's one of our senses. A lot of that though starts in words and in language, and it all starts with empathy. So design thinking, empathy, definition, the ideation, prototyping, testing, then repeating that in a loop, repeating that in a loop, repeating that in a loop, over and over again. But notice that the first one is empathy. And one of the things that's interesting and what I'm seeing in my role as a designer, I'm a graphic designer. That's what I studied. I learned how to do the formal things, color typography, et cetera. My transition into UX over time really became a lot about my ability to empathize and my ability to play the role of the user. So I'm really good at being able to let go of my point of view. That's hard for designers because we're trained in design school that you need to like, you know, be like, you know, your point of view, your idea, your concept. As artist sometimes we're a little, the word in Italian is (speaks In Italian), in Spanish, stubborn, maybe. We might be a little stubborn and concepts might be a little concrete. That's a challenge in user experience because you have to become, you know, the user, you have to be like a method actor. You have to know what the user feels, how they, and the challenge is, if that's not who you are, especially if you're a developer or a very technically minded designer, your skills empathy might not be as developed. So I'm gonna just touch on that because that's really important. What you're experiencing and what I'm talking about. It's all under the middle you to learn words, Murray of design thinking, and it's a whole new thing and people are gonna talk about it. I'm what I would say, like Switzerland. I don't necessarily, I use all of the different ideas, but I'm not like I'm all about design thinking wrong about or I'm all about one specific thing. I try not to be dogmatic cause I try to flow.

Class Materials

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UX Templates

Ratings and Reviews

PAULINA Chávez
 

Great example of how to work with the client in order to avoid infinite corrections during the design process.

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