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Three Things You Need To Know Before Pitching

Lesson 42 from: Adventure Photography Pro

Alex Strohl

Three Things You Need To Know Before Pitching

Lesson 42 from: Adventure Photography Pro

Alex Strohl

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Lesson Info

42. Three Things You Need To Know Before Pitching

Before you go out and pitch your big idea, we need to go over a handful of important points. Learn about Ad Agencies vs Clients, Image Licensing, and What You Really Want.

Lessons

Class Trailer

Intro

1

Workshop Intro

03:18

Foundations

2

Gear

12:14
3

Gear - My Camera Bags

08:00
4

Mastering Camera Settings

07:41
5

Blue Hour, A How-To

10:45
6

Photos That Move Us

07:19
7

Visual Storytelling 101

07:51
8

Endurance In A World Of Sprinting

06:27
9

Keeping Your Ideas Fresh

08:31
10

Building Your Story Arc

06:44
11

Shooting More: Action Plan

02:01
12

Conveying Emotions

07:52

In the Field

13

The Assignment: Himalaya Pre-Pro

12:08
14

In the Field: The Himalaya Defender Shoot

20:29
15

The Assignment: Canon Pre-Pro

10:25
16

In the Field: Canon USA Shoot

15:06

Editing

17

Keywords & Organizing Images

06:42
18

Commercial Grading

04:47
19

Masking & Radial Filters

12:33
20

Perspective Correction

05:39
21

HDR (Hand-Held)

03:37
22

Black & White Edits

07:00
23

Before & Afters

01:33
24

Moody Grading

13:15
25

IG Export Settings

04:00
26

Web Export Settings

02:44
27

Clone Stamping & Patch Tools

05:51
28

Grading in Lightroom

06:45
29

Hand-Held Panoramas

03:41
30

Radial Filters Pt 2

02:38
31

Delivering Files to Clients

12:33
32

Archiving & Organizing Images

10:15
33

My Favorite Software

03:44

Business

34

Let's Talk Business

01:03
35

Building A Desirable Portfolio

11:17
36

How to Contact Clients

12:00
37

Prospecting: Finding Brands That Fit You

04:16
38

Getting Clients To See Our Value

10:16
39

Paid to Travel the World

14:48
40

The Art of Making Moodboards & Treatments

08:09
41

Keys To A Fulfilling Career

07:40
42

Three Things You Need To Know Before Pitching

06:19
43

Finding Your Value Proposition

08:02
44

Media Kit: A Walk Through

08:06
45

How I Built My Audience

07:46
46

Social Media Landscape

07:32
47

Module Recap

03:08

Bonus - Everything To Know About Filters

48

Do You Need Lens Filters?

09:36
49

Filters in The Field

12:40

Bonus - Find Your Path

50

Find Your Path

07:44

Bonus - How To Print Your Work

51

Why Print or Sell Photos

23:21
52

Preparing Photos for Print

06:44
53

Reviewing Major U.S Printers

06:57

Lesson Info

Three Things You Need To Know Before Pitching

(gentle music) Here are three things you need to know before you start pitching clients. (camera shutter clicks) What's the difference between ad agency and client? I'm gonna try to clear the air. So the ad agency works for the client, AKA, the brand. The brand hires the agency to come up with ideas and run campaigns for them. The brand, on the other hand, has a marketing team that hires that agency. The agency has a social media creative team, visual team, account directors, account managers. And usually, you are talking to them as a creator. Let's take the example of Canon. Canon has an agency called Gray. Gray is responsible for coming up with the creative of all of Canon's digital campaigns. So the way it works is Canon is releasing a new camera. They're gonna tell Gray, Hey, Gray, come up with ideas on how to promote this camera based on the product specs, client's needs, demographics. Now Gray comes up with a creative campaign, takes that to the client. Literally, it's pitched,...

or it's a deck that they pitch to the client. And then the client, Canon, approves it or rejects it, and then it goes back to Gray. Once it's approved, Gray starts to reach out to people like us, photographers and filmmakers. And they're like, "Hey, we have this campaign and we want you to shoot it." That's usually how it works. That is how inbound works, typically. When you, on the other hand, wanna take your idea to a brand, I recommend going directly through the client. From my experience, agencies are not there to be pitched ideas. They're the ones who are paid by their clients to come up with their own ideas and own them. So if you wanna increase your chances of success, it's best to pitch the client directly. (camera shutter clicks) Number two, image licensing terms. And this is a bit boring, but you need to know what licensing means, like the terms, the lingo, and the codes of that. So I'm gonna give you a quick rundown. You've already had to talk with clients who are throwing all kinds of technical licensing terms to you, like OOH or POS. By the way, OOH means out of home, and POS means point of sale. If you wanna command higher rates and earn your clients' trust, you need to be familiar with the structure and the lingo. Like I said, it's not very exciting. But one day, when you're on the phone with an agency who wants to get answers ASAP 'cause usually, it's like, "We need the answer in five minutes," you'll be happy you listened to this episode. Either your photos are rights-managed or royalty free. Meaning you either manage the licensing of your images with the terms I'm going to go over, or you simply just sell the image to the client, and they have unlimited use of it. If you wanna build a recurrent revenue stream as a photographer, you want to do rights-managed. It's obviously more work because you have to keep tabs of the images. You have to quote, you get an invoice, but you can command significantly higher rates. Type of rights, exclusive or non-exclusive. If the client wants the image really bad, they will probably get an exclusive license, meaning that they are the only ones who get to use it for the duration of the license. These type of terms are pretty rare to come by. But when you get them, they're like the golden egg because they're worth two times more. Why? Well, because you can't license that image somewhere else, so they gotta pay for that. So duration, that means how long the licensing is for, six months, one year, two years, one week. It all depends. Region, so the license will typically include the regions that the client is allowed to use the image, worldwide, USA, or Europe, and the more regions, the more cost for the client. And then lastly, it's usage. Some clients will wanna license your image for all media, meaning they can do anything they want with your image. And here's a pretty exhaustive list of all the kind of usage situations you will face. Commercial or editorial. So is it a business or is it a magazine? Then the type of usage? Where will the image be shown? Is it digital? Is it print? Is it billboard? Is it brochure? Is it for private meetings, either for POS, POP, point of sale or point of purchase, like in a store? Before we wrap up licensing terms, let's go through a few scenarios. So first one, I'm licensing a photo to Google for example. They want the image exclusively for one year. Well, if they want it for all usage, like all media usage and regions, worldwide usage, exclusive that should be at least 30,000 bucks. If your coffee shop downstairs wants to license your image to have their menus and on their website for a year, and they don't want exclusive thing, it's probably gonna be a couple 100 bucks. If they're a chain of coffee shops, it's different, it might be a few more. The point is that with these things, it's such a wild jungle, and you gotta adapt to your client. But so I want you to know these terms because being able to talk this language, understand what's being requested of you will just get you to command higher rates. (camera shutter clicks) And then the last and third point I wanna talk about in this episode is that you need to know what you want. I've attended hundreds of meetings in my career, and some of them went pretty okay. Some of them were amazing, and some I just totally bombed. And when I look back at what made the biggest difference in the outcome of a meeting is knowing what I wanted. It's too common for creatives to prep for a meeting an hour before, jot down some talk points on an notepad, and then hope for the best, but that's not enough. To increase our success rate, we better come prepared and know specifically what we want out of this meeting, out of the client. What is the outcome we desire and what do we want the client to do at the end? Do we them to say yes? Do you them to say maybe? Sounds very simple, but knowing what you want from the beginning will just make it so much easier for your client to sort of tag along with you. So when my goals are crystal clear, the meeting is way more productive. And when I think about it, the golden ticket is when your goals align with the client's goals. And that's where preparation comes in handy because we have to gather as much information as we can from the client, and we can draft goals that make us both win. (camera shutter clicks)

Class Materials

Bonus Materials with Purchase

Workbook
A Note From Alex

Ratings and Reviews

Jon
 

Not What I Was Expecting Let me just start by saying that the workshop was very good. There were lots of things that I learned and many insights I took away. Perhaps the greatest bit of wisdom imparted to me was not anything Alex said but how he approached every subject he talked about. I felt that he was talking to me as a friend, very personal and open book. This was both a blessing and a curse as the course tends to meander around and is not as structured as others I've taken. Alex's passion for the highest quality, and craftsmanship in every aspect of his business, is very evident. From the premiums he charges, to the attention to detail in client deliveries. This is where my review is going to give some hopefully constructive criticisms. For someone so focused on a premium experience I was a surprised to find the course a bit sloppily assembled, and the videography and editing lackluster. This is coming from a videographer and someone with a lot of experience in online training. A few short examples to illustrate my point include: repeating segments of the edit (in some instances the exact same segment), poor framing. Colors changing between cuts, and my biggest pet peeve, not leaving photo examples on for long enough to see them. These are all small things, but they add up, and along with the topics meandering, left me a bit disappointed. I'm curious who you would say this class is aimed towards. Amateurs, mid-level, or experts? The assumption of who you are addressing changes throughout the course. I feel like with a bit of work from an instructional designer, and some editing cleanup, you could help hone this course to be one of the best out there. I feel like I need to do a more in depth review than will fit here, to actually explain this well. Let me know if that would be helpful to you. One other note: When I signed up for a workshop on Adventure Photography, I honestly thought it would be more field focused. The field examples were all shoots for products, and not shoots documenting an adventure. I guess I had just hoped to learn that side of the storytelling process more. Getting into the nitty gritty of being wet, cold, and dirty, and still shooting bangers. The section on filters (going out and building the snow cave) was more what I thought this course was going to be. Anyhow, with all that said, I still found it valuable and worthwhile. To summarize, the course feels a bit unpolished and in some ways unfinished though there is still great value. I've taken Jimmy Chin's Masterclass on adventure photography and it felt very structured and highly polished. I purchased "Adventure Pro" on the "finish in a month" discount. I would have felt ripped off if I had paid full price with the course in its current state. Thanks for reading and I hope my criticisms come as helpful. As I've already mentioned I'd be happy to further elaborate.

Topher Hammond
 

One of the best photography investments I'm only 1/4 of the way through Alex's course and I feel like I already have a loose plan on how I can move forward in my own career as a photographer. I felt like my work was lacking a specific feeling. The way that Alex articulated ideas on how to convey emotion in your imagery and building that overarching story arc for your own life narrative were super helpful to focus on how to make my work better. Super looking forward to the rest of this course. Thanks Alex and team!

Sergi Mas de xaxars Rosell
 

Great Workshop I learned quite a lot with this workshop. Because I'm in the industry for 5 years now, there were a few things I already knew. On the other hand, Alex showed me different and more effective ways to improve my business. I like the way he gives the lessons, always in a personal and close way. This is the knowledge I wish I had when I started. Totally worth it!

Student Work

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